No Time to Lose: A Search for Work / Life Balance


Latest links by notimetolose

Since concern about work/life balance — rather the growing lack of it! — seems to have only grown since NTTL was presented at Peacock Visual Arts in 2008, I’ve decided to continue posting links and other information here as part of an ongoing commitment to this project.

Here are a few items that have come up recently, that I’d like to add…

1) Another exhibition

Workers Leaving the Workplace exhibition curated by Joanna Sokolowska– Muzeum Sztuki in Lodz – 06.07 – 05.09.2010

The point of departure for the exhibition are contemporary changes of labour and production referred to by researches as „post-fordism” and connected with the development of the global information society and economy based on services and knowledge. This model of economy has extended the traditional borders of productivity by a complex and diverse set of social, intellectual, emotional and communicative processes, thus leading to engagement of workers` and consumers` subjectivity into cycles of production and reproduction of capital beyond fixed hierarchies and categories. Labour viewed from this perspective becomes biopolitics: management of life, creating its new forms. Productivity enters areas it used to be separated from: these of free time, entertainment, aesthetic experiences, social involvement, political action and housework. The requirements of constant efficiency, self-education and flexibility in adjusting to the constantly changing conditions also known today as self-improvement have caused us not to cease producing capital even after leaving our workplace.

The exhibition will debate three main intertwining themes: industrial labour, broadened and hybrid character of contemporary productivity, an artist‘s work and economy. The works focused on industry or its remnants will examine labour processes connected to the factory incorporated into immaterial flows of meaning, that determine in fact entire production cycles. The artists who position labour within the wide field of social and generic activities will particularly concentrate on an ambivalent, flexible and elusive dimension of work today, which often makes the worker function on the verge between self-realization and (self)exploitation. To what extent are the artistic practices – operating with and reprocessing after all images and meanings – reliant on the current transformations of capitalism? What kind of economies might be conceived by the artists, what is their potential to break away from the dominant modes of production?

In relation to the exhibition two new works are being prepared: Janek Simon’s project at Alaba International Market in Nigeria and “The History of the Bomb” by Roman Dziadkiewicz

The Workers Leaving the Workplace project further develops some questions raised by the exhibition Arbeiter verlassen die Arbeitsstätte at the Galerie für Zeitgenőssische Kunst in Leipzig in 2009.

Artists: Joseph Beuys, Rafał Bujnowski, Roman Dziadkiewicz, Miklós Erhardt, Harun Farocki, Aleksandar Batista Ilić (in collaboration with Ivana Keser and Tomislave Gotovac) Kristina Inčiūraitė, Piotr Jaros, Ali Kazma, Jean-Luc Moulène, Frédéric Moser & Philippe Schwinger, Peter Piller, Martha Rosler, Mika Rottenberg, Janek Simon, Škart, Mladen Stilinović, Mona Vătămanu & Florin, Tudor, Ingo Vetter, Haegue Yang, Artur Żmijewski

For more information, contact: Joanna Sokolowska — j.sokolowska@msl.org.pl — or visit http://www.msl.org.pl/


2) Creepy news that is not about being flexible but rather about justifying cuts to social security

“British should set their own retirement age”, The Times (UK) via eurotopics

The British government plans to prevent employers from retiring employees aged 65 who want to go on working. The daily The Times is delighted: “In earlier decades, when employment was dominated by manufacturing, workers were a drag on productivity as they became physically weaker. But in an economy characterised by the provision of services and the application of knowledge, older workers contribute far more. A default retirement age is neither a boon to them nor a way of improving the productivity of the workforce. On the contrary, it adds to one burden that an ageing society does impose, namely the expanding costs of pension provision. The proposal to abolish the DRA would ameliorate that problem by its symbolism. In indicating that older workers have an important contribution to the world of work, the Government may persuade many of them to stay within it. They will pay taxes as well as draw pensions.” (30/07/2010)

3) Omega Interventions: Burnout-Performance

For more info, visit: http://www.rebelart.net/diary/omega-interventions-burnout-performance/005820/

4) They don’t because they can’t…

Canadians not using their vacation time
Talbot Boggs, The Canadian Press
(Special) – Canadians aren’t getting enough – vacations that is.

“A new Harris/Decima poll has found that although Canadian workers have an average of 19.68 days a year off, almost one quarter don’t use all their vacation time and give back an average of 2.17 days.

The most common reasons Canadians give for not using their full vacation time include not scheduling their vacation well enough in advance, they are too busy to get away or their significant others are not able to get away from their jobs.”

Read more: http://finance.sympatico.ca/home/canadians_not_using_their_vacation_time_/125050dd

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Onthaasting: About Spare Time and Slower Worlds by notimetolose
November 16, 2008, 12:25 pm
Filed under: artists, contemporary art, curating, exhibition | Tags: , , ,

Onthaasting: About Spare Time and Slower Worlds
Curated by Niels Van Tomme and Jan Van Woensel

Onthaasting is a mental diversion through the use of recreation as an “escape” from the perceived unpleasant aspects of daily life. It takes place on the outskirts of contemporary life: on mountaintops, in wide-open plains, in churches, in landscapes, in gardens … but most of all in the mind. The exhibition presents Belgian contemporary video artists within this conceptual framework.

Artists: Guillaume Bijl, Jacques Charlier, Cel Crabeels, De Brassers, Messieurs Delmotte, Gery De Smet, Harald Thys & Jos De Gruyter.

November 11 – December 21, 2008

American University Museum
Katzen Arts Center
4400 Massachusetts Ave NW
Washington, DC 20016

http://www.american.edu/cas/katzen/museum/2008nov_onthaasting.cfm

OPENING RECEPTION: Saturday November 22, 2008, 6:00 PM – 9:00 PM

LECTURES:

Saturday November 22, 2008, 4:00 PM
Onthaasting – The Exhibition as a State of Mind
Co-curator Niels Van Tomme will explain the concept of the exhibition. Through wide-ranging references, Van Tomme plans to merge the national with the personal, the theoretical with the anecdotal.

Saturday December 20, 2008 4:00 PM
Belgians on Holiday
Co-curator Jan Van Woensel will explore the peculiar behavior of Belgians during their vacation at the beach. The lecture takes the 1996 surreal cult movie ‘Camping Cosmos’ as a key example.

Exhibition and all events free and open to the public.



A few installation shots of “Block of Ice +1/60” by notimetolose

I think everyone has waited long enough for installation photos from Tobaron Waxman’s performance, Block of Ice +1/60, a new media performance-based installation that took place at Peacock Visual Arts as part of No Time to Lose. Thanks for your patience =-).

The press release and images follow…

BLOCK OF ICE + 1/60

LIVE ART PERFORMANCE AND MULTIMEDIA INSTALLATION BY TOBARON WAXMAN

PEACOCK VISUAL ARTS
22-26 July
Daily 9.30am – 5.30pm
Admission free

Can you work even while you are asleep? Artist Tobaron Waxman proves with Block of Ice + 1/60, that he can. His live art performance connecting labour and water ecology is the final part of ‘No Time to Lose’, an exhibition exploring the theme of ‘overwork’.

Waxman’s brain functions like that of a shift worker, i.e. he sleeps during the day and works during the night. The impressive installation Block of Ice + 1/60 involves the artist sleeping in a large hammock suspended from the gallery ceiling, next to a heavy 200 pounds block of ice hanging from the ceiling as well…

While the artist sleeps, biofeedback from his brainwaves are monitored in a process allowing him to pull images from the internet. The images are subsequently projected onto a block of ice as it melts over the course of the week.

Passing through a filtration system the ice melts into bottles while, at the same time, screen captures of the projection are printed onto labels. Upon waking at night, the artist begins his ‘working day’ by applying the labels to each bottle thus generating an artist’s multiple. The bottles are a unique edition for sale, with proceeds going to not-for-profits concerned with labour and hydrology.

Block of Ice +1/60 reveals the boundaries between social and personal experiences of ‘schedule’ and the notion of 9 to 5 as the minimum “respectable” work hours. It’s an image juxtaposing the ecology of work opposite the fragile balance of the water table.

Remember, larger versions of these images are available at: http://www.flickr.com/photos/notimetolose/



Excerpts from our June 13 roundtable discussion by notimetolose
August 6, 2008, 11:09 am
Filed under: artists, curating, exhibition, ideas, interactive, videos | Tags: , , , ,

Thank you to Adam Proctor and Sean James Fraser, as well as the other staff members of Peacock Visual Arts for facilitating and documenting our roundtable discussion on June 13. The following video offers a 14 minute collection of highlights from our hour-long conversation.

Feel free to keep the conversation going by posting comments!

Edit: Hmmmm… wordpress won’t let me embed the video, so here’s the url…

No Time To Lose – Artist’s Talk from 3sixty-tv on Vimeo.



Wednesday Night by notimetolose

I’ve been working on No Time to Lose since October 2005.

The artists were confirmed by the end of November 2005.

I started looking for a venue in January 2006. Many galleries around the world were interested, but almost all of them felt unable to proceed if funding was not already confirmed.

Monika at Peacock Visual Arts expressed interest in the exhibition sometime in January or February 2007. We started planning immediately and fundraising was probably the activity that took up the most of our time behind the scenes.

In December 2007, external influences appeared to significantly affect our plans. There was a possibility that we’d need to move our opening to April 2009! So, in February 2008 we finalized a grant application that — thankfully! — allowed us to proceed as planned.

It’s now June 2008 and it’s so exciting, to all of us involved, that No Time to Lose is finally happening! Celebrating this fact surely warranted an evening out! We all had a little more work to do afterhours, but an early stop into a pub after a visit to an opening at the Aberdeen Arts Centre seemed most appropriate!

Everyone in Aberdeen is so friendly! We met a ton of great folks during our time out, some of whom promise to be at the opening on Thursday night! We warned photos would be posted on this blog… and they were all great sports about it!



Things are starting to roll! by notimetolose
July 13, 2007, 4:12 pm
Filed under: artists, contemporary art, curating, exhibition, updates

Hi everyone!

Just a little update…

The exhibition dates for No Time to Lose are set and will soon be announced, and Monika and I are in the process of discussing details related to the budget. The artists’ projects are also well underway.

I don’t want to reveal too much at the moment, but as a sample, I’d like to welcome you to visit six websites dedicated to work featured in the show:

More coming soon =-)



Early Morning Meeting by notimetolose
May 1, 2007, 4:27 pm
Filed under: Aberdeen, curating, photos, planning, updates

PVA Office

Originally uploaded by notimetolose.exhibition

I am grateful for the opportunity Monika and I had to meet in person. Even with email, Skype, and the telephone, face-to-face really does wonders!

Our visit was short, but we accomplished a lot. In one evening, catch-up and planning over dinner, an early morning meeting the next day (which involved a great tour of the Gallery’s facilities + a careful look at the available exhibition spaces), and then I was back on a bus, and then a plane, and en route to my next destination. Brief, but very effective; freelance work in the 21st century has to be!