No Time to Lose: A Search for Work / Life Balance


TEXTE ZUR KUNST: Life at work by notimetolose
September 9, 2010, 11:32 am
Filed under: ideas, publication | Tags: , , , , , , , , ,


This issue of “Texte zur Kunst” bears the programmatic title “Life at Work”. Admittedly, this means to take up quite a bit, for at issue is nothing less than revaluating a theoretical and historical relation that has determined the history of modern and contemporary art like almost no other: Since “around 1800”, the forms of art have been ascribed a quasi-organic life of their own. An important trend in modern aesthetics sought to evoke liveliness, with the aim of offering resistance to the commodified world of capitalism itself. But how does this problematic pose itself today? Is a critical reference to “life” in art and beyond at all possible after theories of biopolitics have insistently argued that capitalism has permeated all areas of life?

Plus reviews from Berlin, Madrid, Zurich, Basel, Tel Aviv, Vienna, Barcelona, Munich, Cologne, Frankfurt am Main, Leverkusen, and Kraichtal

Exclusive new artists’ editions:
Louise Lawler, Thomas Scheibitz

ENGLISH CONTENT

SVEN LÜTTICKEN
ACTS IN THE AGE OF VIRTUOSO PERFORMANCE

BRANDEN W. JOSEPH
LEE LOZANO’S DREAM OF LIFE

ERIC C. H. DE BRUYN
INTERMITTENT CONVERSATIONS ON LEAVING THE FACTORY

PATENTED IDEALISM
A Conversation between Sven Lütticken and Hito Steyerl

SABETH BUCHMANN
LIFE AS ALLEGORY
On Joseph Beuys’s “La revoluzione siamo Noi”

RACHEL HAIDU
PERFORMANCE LIFE

PAUL CHAN
MIRACLES, FORCES, ATTRACTIONS, RECONSIDERED

REVIEWS

ALEXANDER ALBERRO
THE SILVER LINING OF GLOBALIZATION
On “The Potosí Principle” at the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid

MICHAEL SANCHEZ
A DOSE OF FEELING
On Michael Krebber at Galerie Daniel Buchholz, Berlin

ARTISTS’ EDITIONS

LOUISE LAWLER
“DISCERNIBLE DIFFERENCE”, 2010

THOMAS SCHEIBITZ
“MASTERPLAN”, 2010

For additional information, orders or subscriptions please contact:

TEXTE ZUR KUNST
STRAUSBERGER PLATZ 19
10243 BERLIN
Germany

TEL +49 (0)30 – 30 10 453 45
FAX +49 (0)30 – 30 10 453 44

editionen@textezurkunst.de
http://www.textezurkunst.de

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It’s finally here! by notimetolose
April 12, 2010, 4:37 pm
Filed under: artists, contemporary art, publication | Tags: , , , , ,

Our publication, No Time to Lose: A Search for Work/Life Balance, has finally arrived!


Staff at PVA report that it looks great! My copy should be reaching me by mail in a few weeks.

Information about how to order your very own copy coming soon!!



New delicious bookmarks added by notimetolose
September 26, 2009, 12:31 pm
Filed under: ideas, news articles | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

A recent flurry of great blog suggestions have arrived from Monika, Abby, and electronic news lists at large. Rather than post each separately (the ongoing plight of overwork is driving me nuts!), I am summarizing the links here. All can be found at http://delicious.com/notimetolose, as well…

“The Long Work Hours Culture”
http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/story.asp?storycode=405651&encCode=917617571BC14249875JTBS737226611

Julia Bryan-Wilson, Art Workers. Radical Practice in the Vietnam War Era, October 2009
http://www.ucpress.edu/books/pages/10899.php

The Vera List Centre for Art and Politics
Panel Discussion & Art Installation: Changing Labor Value
Tuesday, September 29, 2009
http://www.veralistcenter.org/237

But, oh my… the one from Abby on Family360 sounds especailly wacky!! I think I will post it separately… asap.  :Shudder!:



A few more book recommendations… by notimetolose
August 6, 2008, 11:41 am
Filed under: activism, ideas | Tags: ,

Thanks Monika!

Kusnet, David. Love the Work, Hate the Job: Why America’s Best Workers Are Unhappier Than Ever. Wiley, 2008.

From the Inside Flap…

Why are so many of America’s most educated, skilled, and committed workers angrier than ever?

In Love the Work, Hate the Job, author David Kusnet follows workers through four conflicts in the trailblazing city of Seattle. At Boeing, aircraft engineers and technicians conducted the longest and largest strike by professionals in private industry in U.S. history, but their picket signs said they were “On Strike for Boeing.” At Microsoft, thousands of workers holding short-term positions founded their own Web site to protest being “perma-temps.” Still, they were almost as upset about their problems testing software as they were about their own precarious prospects. At a local hospital, workers complained that patient care was getting short shrift and organized with the nation’s fastest-growing union. And at Kaiser Aluminum, during a labor-manage-ment conflict that dragged on for two years, workers allied themselves with environmentalists to fight cutthroat corporate tactics.

Like their counterparts across the country, these workers cared about much more than money. Americans increasingly like the work they do but not the conditions under which they do it. In fact, a growing number of employees believe they care more about the quality of their products and services than the executives they work for. That’s why the workplace conflicts of the future will focus on model employees who were forced to become malcontents because they “care enough to get mad.”

Coming in the aftermath of the mass protests at the World Trade Organization meeting in Seattle in 1999, these conflicts point out the paradox of globalization. U.S. companies can compete most successfully by improving quality instead of just cutting costs. But penny-pinching practices can prevent their best workers from doing their best work, fueling workplace conflicts and depriving businesses of their single greatest advantage.

With powerful storytelling, revealing detail, and compelling analysis, Love the Work, Hate the Job offers provocative insights into today’s workplaces, tomorrow’s headlines, and Americans’ too-often thwarted aspirations to do their jobs better.

* * *

Bell, Daniel. Work and Its Discontents. Beacon Press, 1956.

I wasn’t able to find an summary of this book, but check out the date it was published. We are clearly not facing a new crisis; we’re just coming to the end of our ropes…



Take Back Your Time: Fighting Overwork & Time Poverty In America by notimetolose

While stopping by Take Back Your Time’s website, I was prompted to repost some information about a very interesting book. Although the emphasis here is on life in America (in particular, the United States of America), the content surely applies to so many, many more places worldwide…

Take Back Your Time: Fighting Overwork & Time Poverty In America
By John de Graaf, Editor
Berrett-Koehler Publishers, July 2003.

Table of Contents

Preface: TAKE BACK YOUR TIME DAY

Introduction: TIME POVERTY AND WHAT WE CAN DO ABOUT IT –John de Graaf, co-author, Affluenza

PART I: OVERWORK IN AMERICA
– AN ISSUE FOR EVERYBODY — Barbara Brandt, National Staffperson, The Shorter Work-Time Group, Boston
– THE (EVEN MORE) OVERWORKED AMERICAN — Juliet Schor, Professor of Sociology at Boston College and author of The Overworked American
– THE INCREDIBLE SHRINKING VACATION — Joe Robinson, Director of the National Work To Live Campaign, Santa Monica, CA
– FORCED OVERTIME IN THE LAND OF THE FREE — Lonnie Golden, Professor of Economics, Penn State University

PART II: TIME IS A FAMILY VALUE
– OVERSCHEDULED KIDS, UNDERCONNECTED FAMILIES — Bill Doherty, Professor of Family Therapy, University of Minnesota, and Barbara Carlson, co-founder, Putting Family First, Minneapolis
– RECAPTURING CHILDHOOD — Betsy Taylor, Executive Director, The Center for a New American Dream, Takoma Park, Maryland
– WHAT ABOUT FLUFFY AND FIDO? — Camilla Fox, National Campaign Director, The Animal Protection Institute, Sacramento, CA

PART III: THE COST TO CIVIL SOCIETY
– WASTED WORK, WASTED TIME — Jonathan Rowe, Director of the Tomales Bay Institute, Pt. Reyes, CA
– TIME TO BE A CITIZEN — Paul Loeb, author, The Soul of a Citizen
– TIME AND CRIME — Charles Reasons, Professor of Law and Justice, Central Washington University

PART IV: HEALTH HAZARDS
– AN HOUR A DAY (COULD KEEP THE DOCTOR AWAY) — Suzanne Schweikert, MD, Physician, San Diego, CA
– THE (BIGGER) PICTURE OF HEALTH — Stephen Bezruchka, MD, University of Washington School of Public Health, Seattle

PART V: ENVIRONMENTAL CONSEQUENCES OF THE HURRIED LIFE
– HASTE MAKES WASTE — David Wann, co-author, Affluenza
– THE SPEED TRAP — Robert Bernstein, Sierra Club Transportation Working Group, Santa Barbara, CA
– ON TIME, HAPPINESS AND ECOLOGICAL FOOTPRINTS — Tim Kasser, Professor of Psychology, Knox College, Illinois, and Kirk Warren Brown, Professor of Psychology, University of Rochester, NY

PART VI: HISTORICAL AND CULTURAL PERSPECTIVES
– WHEN WE HAD THE TIME — Benjamin Hunnicutt, Professor of Leisure Studies, University of Iowa
– CAN AMERICA LEARN FROM SHABBAT? — Rabbi Arthur Waskow, The Shalom Center, Philadelphia

PART VII: TAKING BACK YOUR TIME
– ENOUGH-THE TIME COST OF STUFF — Vicki Robin, co-author, Your Money or Your Life, chair of The Simplicity Forum
– THE SIMPLE SOLUTION — Cecile Andrews, author of Circle of Simplicity and lecturer at Stanford University

PART VIII: WORKPLACE SOLUTIONS

– A JOB TO SHARE — Carol Ostrom, staff writer, The Seattle Times
– A NEW BOTTOM LINE — Irene Myers, Larry Gaffin, Barbara Schramm, career counselors
– WORKING RETIRED — Beverly Goldberg, Director of Publications, The Century Foundation and author of Age Works
– A CASE FOR SABBATICALS — Bob Sessions, Professor of Sociology at Kirkwood College, Iowa, and Lori Ericson, freelance writer
– AMERICA NEEDS A BREAK — Karen Nussbaum, director of the Women’s Division, and Chris Owens, Director of Public Policy, The AFL-CIO
– IT WOULD BE GOOD FOR BUSINESS TOO — Sharon Lobel, Professor of Business and Management, Seattle University

PART IX: RETHINKING PATTERNS OF CULTURE
– RECIPES FOR CHANGE — Anna Lappe, food activist and co-author, Hope’s Edge, New York City
– TIME BY DESIGN — Linda Breen Pierce, author of Choosing Simplicity, Carmel, CA

PART X: CHANGING PUBLIC POLICY
– EUROPE’S WORK-TIME ALTERNATIVES — Anders Hayden, author of Sharing The Work, Sparing The Planet
– A POLICY AGENDA FOR TAKING BACK TIME — Jerome Segal, Professor of Philosophy and Public Policy, University of Maryland
– WHAT’S AN ECONOMY FOR? — David Korten, former professor at Stanford and Harvard Business Schools and author of When Corporations Rule The World

RESOURCES FOR TAKING ACTION

– ORGANIZING TAKE BACK YOUR TIME DAY IN YOUR COMMUNITY — Sean Sheehan, Outreach Director of the Center for a New American Dream
– HOW TO DO A TEACH-IN OR A SPEAK-OUT — Cecile Andrews and John de Graaf
– HOW TO REACH YOUR LOCAL MEDIA — Eric Brown, Director of Communications of the Center for a New American Dream