No Time to Lose: A Search for Work / Life Balance


Why Being an Unproductive Worker for Capitalist Corporations is Revolutionary by notimetolose

It is idiotic for a slave to be productive for their master. It is stupid for the working-class to be productive for the enemy, capitalist, class. Workers of the world must unite in an effort to derail the capitalist economy through chronic unproductivity. Workers must destroy capitalism by using unproductive labor to suck the life/capital out of it.

http://www.lulu.com/shop/revolutionary-books/why-being-an-unproductive-worker-for-capitalist-corporations-is-revolutionary/ebook/product-20526508.html;jsessionid=FC470B5BD1B87CE27D482B24AC8A2992



How to be a Good Intern by notimetolose

How to be a Good Intern from Libby Page on Vimeo.

Libby Page writes:

This is the trailer for my short film that will be launching in summer 2013, called All Work and No Pay.

For several years unpaid internships have made headlines and created a social media buzz, yet the foundations of the fashion industry are still built on the bricks of unpaid labour.

But how solid are these foundations?

All Work and No Pay argues that we are approaching the tipping point in the internship debate. It will get inside the issue by talking to interns and employers alike and following the campaigners who are pushing to eradicate this unpaid internship epidemic.

THE INDUSTRY SAYS: “We can’t afford to pay our interns.”
LIBBY SAYS: “You can’t afford not to.”

https://vimeo.com/53873238



WORK, WORK, WORK – a series of seminars on Art and Labour at Iaspis by notimetolose

This looks great and I’m disappointed I’ll be missing it as I was in Stockholm in October and will be returning in January…

Mladen Stilinović, "Chinese Business," 2009 (detail). Collage.*

The seminar series at Iaspis discusses the image of work, the worker and the workplace in relation to diverse strategies within contemporary art. What roles are played by spatial organisation and activism? What concepts are the descriptions of artistic production and labour framed by? What ideologies are involved in the production of the artistic subject? Is the artist a role model for the contemporary “post-fordian” worker—flexible, creative, adaptable and cheap—a creative entrepreneur within an advanced service economy?

The first seminar treats contemporary and historical images of labour, and reflects on what type of “worker” the artist could be. On the Conditions of Production brings up the organisation of work within the art world. The third seminar discusses what role art can play—politically and socially—in relation to the public realm and spatiality. Artists, curators, activists, architects and researchers are contributing to the seminars.

The program is curated by Michele Masucci (artist), Annika Enqvist, Cecilia Widenheim and Jonatan Habib Engqvist (Iaspis). For further information http://www.iaspis.se

Seminar#1: Representations of Labour
20 November 10 am – 6 pm

What is the image of work? How and by whom has this image been produced? What are the means of production involved in artistic representations of workers, workers movements and the workplace? What are the theoretical and practical challenges in these representations? How is the role of the artist presented and what kind of “worker” is the artist? The seminar addresses what work is and has been through experiences of work and questions concerning migration, economy, class and technology.

Participants include: Annika Eriksson (artist, Berlin), Kirsten Forkert (artist/researcher, London), Ingela Johansson (artist, London), Stefan Jonsson (writer, Stockholm), Maria Lind (curator, Stockholm), Sarat Maharaj (writer, London/Malmö), Pratchaya Phinthong (artist, Bangkok), Joanna Sokolowska (curator, Lodz), Nina Svensson (artist, Stockholm)

Seminar#2: On the Conditions of Production
27 November 2 pm – 6 pm
28 November 10 am – 5 pm

A two day workshop hosted by a research group initiated by BAC (Baltic Art Center) in Visby. What are the general terms of production in society at large? How does economy, cultural politics and media relate to art? What does alienation imply in an increasingly socially oriented production process? What is the distribution of labour within the art world; what are the pros and cons of today’s system? Could one imagine an open working process, independent from predefined expectations? How can one organise a production-based residency today? The Open Call for Contributions aims at opening the ongoing research process and add to the discussion. In order to contribute and participate, please register by email to ontheconditionsofproduction@gmail.com

Participants include: Kajsa Dahlberg (artist, Berlin), Kim Einarsson (director Konsthall C, Stockholm/Berlin), Mattìn (artist, Berlin), Michele Masucci (artist, Stockholm), Lisa Rosendahl (director BAC, Visby/Berlin), Fredrik Svensk (writer and critic, Göteborg), Alexei Penzin (philosopher, Moscow) and contributing practitioners.

Seminar#3: Art for Social and Spatial Change
3 December, 5 – 9 pm
4 December, 10.30 am – 5.30 pm

Two days revolving around the question of what it means to take action today. The conversations include intersectional perspectives on labour and the so-called creative industry. What are our possibilities to act within an artistic practice in social, spatial and political change? In what way are conflicts concerning work expressed in the workspace and in society? How is public space staged in the private? How can emancipatory political projects such as the feminist and queer movements separate themselves from an increasing commodification of political and social subjects? Is it possible to imagine a “movement” in the sense of a collective process of the transformation of reality today?

Participants include: Lars Bang Larsen (writer and curator, Barcelona), Franco Berardi (researcher, Bolongna), Ana Betancour (professor architecture, Göteborg), Catharina Gabrielsson (architect and reseacher, Stockholm), Helena Mattsson (ass. professor and architect, Stockholm), Raqs Media Collective (artists and activists, New Dehli), Nina Power (researcher, Roehampton) and Judith Revel (philosopher, Paris) among others.

On display, “Chinese Business” by Mladen Stilinović (Iaspis, 2009)

The series takes place at Iaspis in relation to the exhibition Image at Work produced
by XpoSeptember in collaboration with Index, The Romanian Culture Institute and Moderna Museet.

Iaspis, Swedish Arts Grants Committee
Maria skolgata 83, 2nd floor
Stockholm, Sweden
http://www.iaspis



“MASHING UP” : Art+Labour … a public conversation by notimetolose
October 19, 2010, 10:03 am
Filed under: activism, events | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

“MASHING UP” :
Art+Labour
a public conversation

CCA 5
Tue 9th Nov 2010
12.30-6pm

Art+Labour is a public conversation exploring the conditions and experiences of creative labour in the cultural industries – working conditions, pay, working hours; freedom and autonomy, pleasure and obligation; insecurity and uncertainty; social reproduction, networking and isolation – and artists’ organising within it – unions, artists’ associations, or self-organised studio/exhibition spaces.

What diverse forms of employment do artists undertake? Who are their employees? How secure and how flexible are these forms of employment? What are the conditions of employment and how are these changing? What can we say of artists’ autonomy in relation to contemporary labour practices? How do cultural workers effectively organise around labour issues? What would it mean for artists to withdraw their labour in defence of conditions in one’s primary or secondary employment? With successive governments’ emphasis on arts’ social function, how does communality express itself in competitive Creative Industries? What is industrial about the Creative Industries; where do ‘Cultural’ producers sit within the policy frame of the ‘Creative’ Industries? How do we as cultural producers recognise our own positions and dependency on/within/alongside the public sector? With the entrepreneurial restructuring of the arts in Scotland and in the face of selective public sector cuts throughout the UK, how constructive are artists’ isolated appeals for a state of exception? What is so unique about artists in the social factory?

These are some of the questions to be addressed during this public conversation. The discussion is open to anyone – cultural workers, artists, students, interns, precarious and self-organised labour affiliated to academia – concerned with issues of art, labour and economics. The event will begin with a series of short position statements from invited speakers followed by discussion among panelists and audience.

Panelists include:

  • Angela McRobbie
    Professor of Communications, Dept. of Media & Communications, Goldsmiths
  • Scottish Artists Union
    The representative voice for artists in Scotland
  • Graham Jeffery
    Reader: Music and Performance, The School of Creative and Cultural Industries, UWS
  • Katarzyna Kosmala
    Reader, Centre for Contemporary European Studies, UWS
  • Gesa Helms
    Researcher & artist
  • Brett Bloom
    Member of Chicago-based art collective Temporary Services who recently produced ‘Art Work : A national conversation about art, labour, and economics’
  • Owen Logan
    Researcher, School of Divinity, History and Philosophy, University of Aberdeen
  • Facilitated by Gordon Asher
    Effective Learning Tutor, UWS Centre for Academic & Professional Development

Event is free but ticketed, tickets available from CCA Box Office:
CCA, 350 Sauchiehall Street, Glasgow G2 3JD
tel : +44 (0)141 352 4900
http://www.cca-glasgow.com



Latest links by notimetolose

Since concern about work/life balance — rather the growing lack of it! — seems to have only grown since NTTL was presented at Peacock Visual Arts in 2008, I’ve decided to continue posting links and other information here as part of an ongoing commitment to this project.

Here are a few items that have come up recently, that I’d like to add…

1) Another exhibition

Workers Leaving the Workplace exhibition curated by Joanna Sokolowska– Muzeum Sztuki in Lodz – 06.07 – 05.09.2010

The point of departure for the exhibition are contemporary changes of labour and production referred to by researches as „post-fordism” and connected with the development of the global information society and economy based on services and knowledge. This model of economy has extended the traditional borders of productivity by a complex and diverse set of social, intellectual, emotional and communicative processes, thus leading to engagement of workers` and consumers` subjectivity into cycles of production and reproduction of capital beyond fixed hierarchies and categories. Labour viewed from this perspective becomes biopolitics: management of life, creating its new forms. Productivity enters areas it used to be separated from: these of free time, entertainment, aesthetic experiences, social involvement, political action and housework. The requirements of constant efficiency, self-education and flexibility in adjusting to the constantly changing conditions also known today as self-improvement have caused us not to cease producing capital even after leaving our workplace.

The exhibition will debate three main intertwining themes: industrial labour, broadened and hybrid character of contemporary productivity, an artist‘s work and economy. The works focused on industry or its remnants will examine labour processes connected to the factory incorporated into immaterial flows of meaning, that determine in fact entire production cycles. The artists who position labour within the wide field of social and generic activities will particularly concentrate on an ambivalent, flexible and elusive dimension of work today, which often makes the worker function on the verge between self-realization and (self)exploitation. To what extent are the artistic practices – operating with and reprocessing after all images and meanings – reliant on the current transformations of capitalism? What kind of economies might be conceived by the artists, what is their potential to break away from the dominant modes of production?

In relation to the exhibition two new works are being prepared: Janek Simon’s project at Alaba International Market in Nigeria and “The History of the Bomb” by Roman Dziadkiewicz

The Workers Leaving the Workplace project further develops some questions raised by the exhibition Arbeiter verlassen die Arbeitsstätte at the Galerie für Zeitgenőssische Kunst in Leipzig in 2009.

Artists: Joseph Beuys, Rafał Bujnowski, Roman Dziadkiewicz, Miklós Erhardt, Harun Farocki, Aleksandar Batista Ilić (in collaboration with Ivana Keser and Tomislave Gotovac) Kristina Inčiūraitė, Piotr Jaros, Ali Kazma, Jean-Luc Moulène, Frédéric Moser & Philippe Schwinger, Peter Piller, Martha Rosler, Mika Rottenberg, Janek Simon, Škart, Mladen Stilinović, Mona Vătămanu & Florin, Tudor, Ingo Vetter, Haegue Yang, Artur Żmijewski

For more information, contact: Joanna Sokolowska — j.sokolowska@msl.org.pl — or visit http://www.msl.org.pl/


2) Creepy news that is not about being flexible but rather about justifying cuts to social security

“British should set their own retirement age”, The Times (UK) via eurotopics

The British government plans to prevent employers from retiring employees aged 65 who want to go on working. The daily The Times is delighted: “In earlier decades, when employment was dominated by manufacturing, workers were a drag on productivity as they became physically weaker. But in an economy characterised by the provision of services and the application of knowledge, older workers contribute far more. A default retirement age is neither a boon to them nor a way of improving the productivity of the workforce. On the contrary, it adds to one burden that an ageing society does impose, namely the expanding costs of pension provision. The proposal to abolish the DRA would ameliorate that problem by its symbolism. In indicating that older workers have an important contribution to the world of work, the Government may persuade many of them to stay within it. They will pay taxes as well as draw pensions.” (30/07/2010)

3) Omega Interventions: Burnout-Performance

For more info, visit: http://www.rebelart.net/diary/omega-interventions-burnout-performance/005820/

4) They don’t because they can’t…

Canadians not using their vacation time
Talbot Boggs, The Canadian Press
(Special) – Canadians aren’t getting enough – vacations that is.

“A new Harris/Decima poll has found that although Canadian workers have an average of 19.68 days a year off, almost one quarter don’t use all their vacation time and give back an average of 2.17 days.

The most common reasons Canadians give for not using their full vacation time include not scheduling their vacation well enough in advance, they are too busy to get away or their significant others are not able to get away from their jobs.”

Read more: http://finance.sympatico.ca/home/canadians_not_using_their_vacation_time_/125050dd



Every day the same dream by Molleindustria, by notimetolose

Every day the same dream — you are late for work


A short existential game about alienation and refusal of labour. Or, if you prefer, a playable music video. Created by Molleindustria, an entity that aims to reappropriate video games as a popular form of mass communication. Their objective is to investigate the persuasive potentials of the medium by subverting mainstream video gaming clichè (and possibly have fun in the process).

Check it out here: http://www.molleindustria.org/everydaythesamedream/everydaythesamedream.html



Calling All American Citizens by notimetolose

The following message has just arrived from Take Back Your Time, the work/life balance advocacy group in the United States. Please read and, if you are an American Citizen, please take action!

Dear Take Back Your Time Supporter

NOW IS THE TIME TO REALLY MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN WINNING PAID VACATION TIME FOR AMERICAN WORKERS!!!

WRITE YOUR REPRESENTATIVES AND SENATORS!!!

As you may know, on May 21st, Congressman Alan Grayson introduced H.R. 2564, The Paid Vacation Act of 2009. With other TAKE BACK YOUR TIME board members Joe Robinson and Bill Doherty, I spoke at the news conference introducing the bill. We were joined by economist John Schmitt, family practice doctor Arnold Pallay, and simple living advocate Wanda Urbanska, in addition to Congressman Grayson himself.

We understand that this bill is much more modest than what TAKE BACK YOUR TIME originally called for, yet is in a hugely important step in the right direction and we urge you to support it now. You can let Congress know if you think it should be strengthened, but please register your support for the bill. A full explanation of the bill and rebuttals of the main opposition arguments can now be found on our Web site at:

http://www.timeday.org/right2vacation/PAID%20VACATION%20ACT%20OF%202009.pdf

Or just go to http://www.right2vacation.org/ and check out the second item in BREAKING NEWS.

SO……

PLEASE WRITE OR CALL YOUR U.S. REPRESENTATIVE
https://writerep.house.gov/writerep/welcome.shtml

AND SENATORS
http://www.congress.org/congressorg/home/

You will need to enter your zip code.

URGING THEM TO CO-SPONSOR AND/OR SUPPORT H.R. 2564, THE PAID VACATION ACT OF 2009.

WE VERY MUCH NEED CO-SPONSORS, ESPECIALLY AMONG THE HOUSE TOURISM CAUCUS—SEE IF YOUR REPRESENTATIVE IS A MEMBER AT:

http://www.farr.house.gov/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=260&Itemid=0

IF YOU CAN, SEND A LETTER (MOST EFFECTIVE), AND OTHERWISE SEND CALL THEIR OFFICE OR SEND AN EMAIL.

Make your letter or email as personal as possible. Tell your representative why this is important to you. You can draw from the information on our Web site at:

http://www.timeday.org/right2vacation/PAID%20VACATION%20ACT%20OF%202009.pdf

URGENT REQUEST: PLEASE SUPPORT TAKE YOUR TIME NOW!! Donate at: http://www.timeday.org/. It’s simple!

I’m sorry, we’re not equipped to immediate connect you to your representative as many Web sites are. Unfortunately, TAKE BACK YOUR TIME is dancing on the edge of debt. We are funded entirely by members and supporters at this time and our fund are running out just as we are making major strides in helping to achieve vacation legislation and build our National Vacation Matters Summit. We really need your support now. Please make a donation today online at: http://www.timeday.org/ or by sending a check to CRESP/TAKE BACK YOUR TIME at

TAKE BACK YOUR TIME
PO BOX 19852
SEATTLE, WA 98109

In these hard economic times, your fully tax-deductible donation is needed more than ever. PLEASE DONATE TODAY!

For more information, don’t hesitate to email me at jodg@comcast.net.

Act now! There’s no present like the time!

Thank you for all you do,

John de Graaf
Executive Director
TAKE BACK YOUR TIME